berth

Definitions:

To allot bertha in a ship. To give a wide berth to, to keep well clear of.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb) (v.) (verb)
Enough room at sea for a ship to throw an anchor in; a station which a ship occupies at port; a room in a vessel set apart for officers or seamen; a bunk or bed for a passenger on a ship or railway carriage; a sistuation or appoinment.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
A sleeping- place in a ship; a ship's place at anchor; a place or station.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
The position of a ship at anchor; a space or room in a ship; a place to sleep in : to give a wide berth, to leave considerable room for.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (noun) (n.) (noun)
A ship's station at anchor: a room or sleeping- place in a ship: a situation or place of employment.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To come to an anchoring place.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)
To give an anchorage to; to give a sleeping place to.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
A station in which a ship rides at anchor; a room in a ship; a sleeping- place in a ship; situation or appointment.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)

Usage examples:

Then we had to wait in the boat until the ship rose above the surface and emptied the water out of the boat berth
- Four-Day Planet by Henry Beam Piper
It was a soft berth
- Atlantida by Pierre Benoit
For the camp knew that there were rare moments when it was best to give him a wide berth
- The Plow-Woman by Eleanor Gates