brood

Definitions:

To sit on in order to hatch; to cover with the wings; to continue anxiously pondering.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb, noun) (v. & n.) (verb, noun)
The number of birds hatched at once; offspring; that which is bred. See Breed.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To sit over and cover; to cherish; to meditate.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb) (v.) (verb)
To mature or cherish with care.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
To cover in order to hatch; to cover as with wings; to think persistently.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)
A number hatched at once; offspring.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Offspring; progeny; the number of birds hatched at a time.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Something bred: offspring: the number hatched at once.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To sit over, cover, and cherish; as, to brood eggs.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
To sit on eggs, as a hen; linger sorrowfully; with on or over.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)
To sit over, as a bird over her eggs; to spread over as with wings; to dwell on a subject in anxious thought; to cherish.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (verb) (v.) (verb)
Offspring; the young birds hatched at one time.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To sit upon or cover in order to breed or hatch: to cover, as with wings: to think anxiously for a long time.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)

Usage examples:

When a race begins to brood on the beautiful- so- called- it is a sign of rot, of getting ready to fall from the tree.
- The Damnation of Theron Ware by Harold Frederic
If I hadn't got nice rooms I should brood over it.
- Plays: Lady Frederick, The Explorer, A Man of Honor by William Somerset Maugham
Mrs. Vivian had taken a furnished house at Ilfracombe for two months, a house much larger than she needed for her own brood and she begged Mrs. Carlyle to let her have her brood too for three or four weeks, " to fill the house up comfortably."
- Anxious Audrey by Mabel Quiller-Couch