caper

Definitions:

To leap, skip, or jump; to prance; to spring.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (verb) (v.) (verb)
To skip; jump.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)
A Dutch privateer.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To leap or skip like a goat: to dance in a frolicsome manner.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)
A frelicsome leap, spring, or jump.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To skip or jump; to frisk about.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb, noun) (v. & n.) (verb, noun)
A playful leap or spring; a skip; a prank; a plant, the flower- buds of which are pickled and used as a seasoning.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
The flower- bud of the caper- bush, used for pickling.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)
The flower- bud of the caper- bush.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
A leap; a skip, as in dancing; a leap in sport, as a goat or lamb.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (noun) (n.) (noun)
A leap; antic; bud of the caperbush.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)

Usage examples:

A woman who had been hanging out clothes in a yard began to caper wildly.
- Men, Women, and Boats by Stephen Crane
Then, closing the slate down close, he spun round, cut a caper struck an attitude, and began sparring and dancing round me in the most absurd manner.
- Burr Junior by G. Manville Fenn
But putting all that aside, I should like to bet that the germ, the vital spark of the opera, felt itself life, felt itself flame, first of all in that exquisite moment of release which Nemorino's caper conveys.
- Imaginary Interviews by W. D. Howells