cathartic

Definitions:

Purgative.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
A purging medicine.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (noun) (n.) (noun)
A purge.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
A purgative medicine.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Cleansing the bowels; purgative.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
A medicine to cause movement of the bowels.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)

Usage examples:

Some- times, a gentle cathartic of castor- oil may be needful; but it is best first to try fasting.
- The American Woman's Home by Catherine E. Beecher and Harriet Beecher Stowe
A good cathartic the taking of alkalines, such as baking soda or calcined magnesia, with a bran or starch bath, or possibly a soda bath, will usually correct the difficulty.
- The Mother and Her Child by William S. Sadler Lena K. Sadler
The process which these nuts undergo in the hands of the natives has no effect upon the kernel, which still acts both as a strong emetic and cathartic
- Journals Of Two Expeditions Of Discovery In North-West And Western Australia, Vol. 2 (of 2) by George Grey