chagrin

Definitions:

Vexation; ill- humour.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To fret; to vex. See Shagresn.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb) (v.) (verb)
Vexation; ill- humor.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To vex or annoy.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
To vex; mortify.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
Vexation due to disappointment or mortification.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
That which wears or gnaws the mind: vexation: ill- humor.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)

Usage examples:

Maxwell, who seldom showed what he felt, evinced no chagrin
- The League of the Leopard by Harold Bindloss
She could die of grief and chagrin with a smile on her lips, and with her voice as smooth and musical as the velvet wind of summer.
- Throckmorton by Molly Elliot Seawell
Mrs. Yorke, looking at her as she sat with troubled, downcast eyes, and cheek burning painfully, and figure expressing in its bent attitude and unconscious tremor all the humiliation and chagrin she experienced, felt the sufferer was fair game.
- Shirley by Charlotte Brontë