cogent

Definitions:

Forcible; convincing.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Urgent; pressing on the mind; not easily resisted; convincing.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Driving or pressing on the mind: powerful: convincing.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Cogency.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Having great force; convincing; as, a cogent reason.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Cogently.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adverb) (adv.) (adverb)

Usage examples:

23, 24. Now, O how cogent and persuading is this; one so high, come down so low, one dwelling in inaccessible glory, manifested in the flesh, in the infirmity and weakness of it, to this very purpose, to repair the creation, to make up the breaches of it, to destroy sin, and save the sinner!
- The Works of the Rev. Hugh Binning by Hugh Binning
Not the least cogent proof of this is the literary criticism of the work.
- Roman Society from Nero to Marcus Aurelius by Samuel Dill
The writer who asserts that the oldest work in any language is of such antiquity as to be separated from the next oldest by any very long interval- by an interval which leaves a wide chasm between the first and second specimens of the literature which no fragments and no traces of any lost compositions are found to fill up- makes an assertion which he is bound to support by evidence of the most cogent kind.
- The Ethnology of the British Islands by Robert Gordon Latham