conquer

Definitions:

To gain by conquest; overcome; subdue.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
To be victor.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)
To gain by force; overcome; vanquish.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
To subdue, especially in war and after a struggle; to gain dominion or sovereignty over; to overcome.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb) (v.) (verb)
To overcome by physical force, as an enemy in battle; to vanquish; to defeat; to subdue by argument or by moral influence; to gain by perseverance or effort.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (verb) (v.) (verb)
Conqueror.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To gain by force: to overcome or vanquish.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
To overcome; to gain the victory.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb, noun) (v. & n.) (verb, noun)
To be victorious.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)

Usage examples:

How can you conquer the opinion of another man?
- A Selection from the Discourses of Epictetus With the Encheiridion by Epictetus
So much the better, for we shall conquer more.
- Plutarch's Lives, Volume II by Aubrey Stewart & George Long
But in this world it shall stand and conquer even worse and worse, until the end.
- Hypatia or, New Foes with an Old Face by Charles Kingsley