diplomatic

Definitions:

Pert. to diplomacy; authorised by credentials or letters to transact business for a sovereign at a foreign court; pert. to the foreign ministers at a court, who are called the diplomatic body.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Pertaining to the management of affairs between two nations; characterized by special tact in the management of affairs.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Pertaining to diplomas; privileged; authorized to transact business for a sovereign at a foreign court; versed or skilled in diplomacy; marked with diplomacy; connected with diplomatics.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
An envoy or official agent.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Pertaining to diplomacy.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
A minister at a foreign court.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Diplomatically.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adverb) (adv.) (adverb)
A minister, official agent, or envoy to a foreign court.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)

Usage examples:

And he did not do it for diplomatic reasons, but because such was his character.
- Resurrection by Maude, Louise Shanks
And to this cause, combined with the excessive length of his mother's life, must be ascribed the fact that Pope never went abroad; not to Italy with Thomson or with Berkeley, or any of his diplomatic friends; not to Ireland, where his presence would have been hailed as a national honor; not even to France, on a visit to his admiring and admired friend Lord Bolingbroke.
- Biographical Essays by Thomas de Quincey
Why should not Maurice- you both tell me to call him so- take the diplomatic office which has been offered him?
- A Mortal Antipathy by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.