disjunctive

Definitions:

Separating; in gram., that unites sentences, but disjoins the sense; in logic, having its parts set in opposition.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
In gram., a word which disjoins.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (noun) (n.) (noun)
A word which disjoins.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Tending to disconnect or separate.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
A conjunction which connects grammatically two words or clauses disjoined in meaning; as, either, or, neither, nor, etc.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
DISJUNCTIVELY.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (adverb) (adv.) (adverb)
Tending to disjoin; in gram., uniting words but separating sense.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Separating; disjoining.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Disjoining: tending to separate: ( gram.) uniting sentences but disjoining the sense, or rather, marking an adverse sense.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
A word that disjoins; a disjunctive proposition. A disjunctive conjunction, a word which unites sentences in construction, but disjoins the sense. A disjunctive proposition, a proposition which, instead of a single predicate, has several alternatives united by the disjunctive conjunction " or." A disjunctive syllogism, a syllogism with a disjunctive major premise and a categorical minor.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)

Usage examples:

Neither is the consequence from the second member of the disjunctive a valid inference.
- Ontology or the Theory of Being by Peter Coffey
If as is ever disjunctive it is not so here; nor can we parse it as an adverb, because it comes between two words that are essentially in apposition.
- The Grammar of English Grammars by Goold Brown
Thus he faced about on his disjunctive conjunction, now this way, now that, until he had time to consider what was the very lowest figure he could offer as a basis for his higgling.
- Duffels by Edward Eggleston