dutch

Definitions:

The people of Holland; their language; originally the Germans.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Pert. to Holland- its language or inhabitants; Dutch- clinkers, long narrow bricks from Holland, very hard, and appearing as if vitrified.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Pertaining to Holland or to its inhabitants. Dutch concert, a concert in which each sings his own song simultaneously with the others; an amusement in which each one sings any song he chooses, and the company join in with some popular chorus at the end of each verse. Dutch courage, false courage, or courage inspired by stimulants. Dutch metal or gold, an alloy of copper and bronze made into leaves, and largely used in the ornamenting of toys, & c. Dutch drops, the balsam of turpentine. Dutch pink, a pigment obtained from the plant Reseda Inteola. Dutch rush, the Equisetum hyemale of botanists.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Originally the Germanic race: the German peoples generally: now only applied to the people of Holland. " The word comes from theod, people or nation; each nation, of course, thinking itself the people or nation above all others. And the opposite to Dutch is Welsh- that is, strange, from wealh, a stranger. In our forefathers' way of speaking, whatever they could understand was Dutch, the tongue of the people, whatever they could not understand they called Welsh, the tongue of the stranger. 'All lands, Dutch and Welsh, ' is a common phrase to express the whole world. This is the reason why, when our forefathers came into Britain, they called the people whom they found on the land the Welsh. For the same reason, the Teutons on the Continent have always called the Latin- speaking nations with whom they have had to do- Italian, Provencal, and French- Welsh. People who know only the modern use of the words might be puzzled if they turned to some of the old Swiss chronicles, and found the war between the Swiss and Duke Charles of Burgundy always spoken of as a war between the Dutch and the Welsh. Any one who knows German will be at once ready with instances of this use of the word, sometimes meaning strange, or foreign in the general sense, sometimes meaning particularly French or Italian. The last case which I know of the word being used in England in the wide sense is in Sir Thomas Smith's book on the Government of England, written in the time of Queen Elizabeth, where he speaks of 'such as be walsh and foreign, ' not meaning Britons in particular, but any people whose tongue cannot be understood."- E. A. Freeman.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Pertaining to, or like, the people of Holland, or their language.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
The language of Holland: the Dutch, the people of Holland.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)

Usage examples:

When you go to Holland try to visit Dordrecht, and if possible, go into a real Dutch home.
- The Children's Book of Celebrated Pictures by Lorinda Munson Bryant
I will be in the gallery of the Dutch School"- as she wrote that she seemed to herself rather impressive and, at the same time, everything of a suspicious nature seemed to be removed.
- Bertha Garlan by Arthur Schnitzler
The Dutch however, had left a rear guard sufficient to hold in check so small a force, and it was 2 o'clock before Pepworth's Hill was occupied.
- London to Ladysmith via Pretoria by Winston Spencer Churchill