embark

Definitions:

Embarkation.
- Newage Dictionary DB (noun) (n.) (noun)
To go on board a ship; engage in anything.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)
To put on board a ship; employ in any affair.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
To put on board a ship or other vessel; to engage or invest in any affair.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb) (v.) (verb)
To go on board a ship about to sail; to cause to go on board a ship; to engage in any undertaking; to engage another in any affair.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (verb) (v.) (verb)
To put on board a bark or ship: to engage in any affair.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
To go on board ship: to engage in a business: to enlist.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)
To go on board ship; to engage or enter.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb, noun) (v. & n.) (verb, noun)
To go on board a vessel; engage in any affair; as, to embark in a business.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. t. & v. i.) (verb transitive, verb intransitive)

Usage examples:

No one heeded the boy, and the party marched on toward the river- side, when, under the impression that the man was being taken down to embark once more, and be sent up or down the river, Ned followed, and his guard came now more closely behind.
- The Rajah of Dah by George Manville Fenn
" And it were, colonel, I would not embark in it a step," I cried.
- Richard Carvel, Complete by Winston Churchill Last Updated: March 5, 2009
On the ninth, the weather being pleasant, it was determined to embark for the island.
- The Old Bell Of Independence; Or, Philadelphia In 1776 by Henry C. Watson