expedient

Definitions:

Fit or suitable for the purpose; tending to promote some end; proper or necessary under the circumstances.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
A means; device.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
That which promotes; means; contrivance.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
That which serves to promote: means suitable to an end: contrivance.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Tending to promote an object proposed; serviceable for a purpose; proper under the circumstances; conducive to one's own ends.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
That which serves to promote or accomplish a purpose; means devised or employed in an exigency; shift. See Expedite.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Fit; convenient; advisable.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Suitable: advisable.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Tending to promote; advisable; judicious.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
A contrivance or shift; that which serves to promote or help forward any end or purpose.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (noun) (n.) (noun)
EXPEDIENTLY.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (adverb) (adv.) (adverb)

Usage examples:

If it happened that a distinguished lord was travelling towards the same country, it was expedient to bribe him, for he and his suite, their waggons and horses, were never examined at the city gates.
- Pictures of German Life in the XVth XVIth and XVIIth Centuries, Vol. II. by Gustav Freytag
It was her father who suggested an early marriage and a European trip for bride and groom, as the wisest expedient under the circumstances.
- An Ambitious Man by Ella Wheeler Wilcox
And, moreover that to keep myself out of debt; I have found it expedient now and then to sell Lands, or something else to effect this purpose."
- The True George Washington [10th Ed.] by Paul Leicester Ford