gig

Definitions:

To fish with a gig, or fish- gig.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb) (v.) (verb)
A light two- wheeled carriage; a long light boat; anything light, swift, or whirling; a machine for forming the nap of cloth.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Any little thing that is whirled round in play; a light two- wheeled carriage, drawn generally by one horse; a dart or barpoon; a light ship's boat designed for rapid motion; a racing boat.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
A light two- wheeled carriage; light boat.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Swellings on the insides of a horse's lips; rotary cylinders covered with wire teeth, for teazling woollen cloth.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (pl.) (plural)
A light two- wheeled open carriage drawn by one horse; a long ship's boat; a racing boat.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
A light, two- wheeled carriage: a long, light boat.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)

Usage examples:

So little did Captain Winter like their appearance that, immediately after breakfast- the calm seeming likely to continue for some few hours- he ordered his own gig to be lowered, and went away in her to get a nearer look at them.
- The Log of a Privateersman by Harry Collingwood
" Come quietly, or, by all that's holy, I'll throw you in," said Chris hoarsely; and Glyddyr ceased struggling, and suffered himself to be led to the end, where the crew of the yacht's gig were waiting, smoking, till their master came.
- King of the Castle by George Manville Fenn
Her eyes could dwell upon details more clearly now, and Mr and Mrs Crick having directed their own gig to be sent for them, to leave the carriage to the young couple, she observed the build and character of that conveyance for the first time.
- Tess of the d'Urbervilles A Pure Woman by Thomas Hardy