harness

Definitions:

Armour; the tackle or fittings of horses when employed in dragging carts, coaches, gigs, & c.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To prepare a horse with the necessary fittings for drawing a vehicle; to put on warlike accountrements.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (verb) (v.) (verb)
To equip with armor: to put the harness on a horse.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
The working gear of a horse; the dress and armor of a knight; any arrangement, as of straps, etc., for performing some mechanical operation.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To put harness upon; equip, as a knight.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
Armor; equipments of a horse.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To put harness on.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
The whole accoutrements or armour of a knight; the furniture of a draught horse.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Formerly, the armor of a man or horse: the equipments of a horse.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To equip with armour; to put the harness on; to defend.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb) (v.) (verb)

Usage examples:

Three young men met him, each in battle harness and these four advanced to meet four other men who awaited them at a little distance on the lawn.
- Irish Fairy Tales by James Stephens
He could not make out what his master needed the harness for.
- St. Peter's Umbrella by Kálmán Mikszáth
Matt has taken down the harness
- Three Plays by Padraic Colum