hitch

Definitions:

To move by jerks, or with stops; to become hooked or entangled; to hit the legs together, as horses.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb, noun) (v. & n.) (verb, noun)
A jerk: a catch or anything that holds: an obstacle: a sudden halt: ( naut.) a knot or noose.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To hook: to catch.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
To hook, or catch by a hook; to catch; to move by jerks.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (verb) (v.) (verb)
To move by jerks; be caught.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)
To hook; to catch by a hook; to fasten; to pull up with jerks.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb) (v.) (verb)
A catch, or anything which acts as one; a knot or noose in a rope; a sudden stop or halt; an impediment.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To hook; jerk; fasten.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
A catch or anything that holds; a jerk up; a stop or halt; an impediment; a break; a knot or noose in a rope for fastening it to another object.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To fasten or tie.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
To move by jerks, as if caught by a hook: to be caught by a hook: to be caught or fall into.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)
A catch; that which acts like a catch; impediment; a pulling or jerking upwards.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
A jerk; obstacle; kind of noose.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To become entangled or caught; move by jerks; strike the feet together, as horses.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)

Usage examples:

Yo' orders are that we're to slip out of this a little afore midnight, but suppose there's a hitch here's the lady knowing what she knows and here's the boy knowing what he knows.
- The Prodigal Judge by Vaughan Kester
His strategical combinations were apparently working without a hitch
- Stonewall Jackson And The American Civil War by G. F. R. Henderson
Trouble couldn't hitch the goat to the wagon and drive off with him.
- The Curlytops at Uncle Frank's Ranch by Howard R. Garis