imbibe

Definitions:

To drink in or absorb; to receive into the mind.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb) (v.) (verb)
To drink or suck in; to absorb; to receive or admit into the mind.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (verb) (v.) (verb)
Drink in; absorb.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
Imbiber.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To drink in: to absorb: to receive into the mind.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
To drink in; absorb, as if by drinking; receive or absorb into the mind.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
To drink; absorb moisture.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)

Usage examples:

They inhale, they imbibe they are steeped in the idea, that the great business of their life is marriage, and if they fail to secure that they will become utterly bankrupt and pitiable.
- A New Atmosphere by Gail Hamilton
Here, in one visit, the student may imbibe those principles to ascertain which many artists have consumed the best part of their days; and penetrated by their effect, he is spared the laborious investigation by which they came to be known and established.
- Paris As It Was and As It Is by Francis W. Blagdon
There is great probability that some very clever workmen whose names are lost to us, were with Stradivari for a time, long or short, and were able to imbibe the valuable precepts enjoined similarly on the other disciples.
- Antonio Stradivari by Horace William Petherick