jib

Definitions:

To move restively hackwards or sideways. Flying jib, a sail sometimes set upon a boom rigged out beyond the jib- boom. Middle jib, a similar sail set between the two preceding.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb, noun) (v. & n.) (verb, noun)
The foremost sail of a ship, extending from the outer end of the jib- boom toward the fore- top- mast- head.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To shift a boom- sail from one side of a vessel to the other.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb) (v.) (verb)
A triangular sail borne in front of the foremast in a ship, so called from its shifting of itself.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Triangular sail in front of the foremast.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To move restively.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)
To move restively sidewise or backward, as a horse.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (verb) (v.) (verb)
To shift a boom sail from one tack to the other.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
Jibbed.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (participle) (p.t. & p.p.) (past tense, past participle)
To move restlessly backwards or sideways: a d of a horse.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)
The foremost sail of a ship, which shifts of itself from side to side as required by the wind; the projecting beam of a crane.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (noun) (n.) (noun)
A large three cornered sail projecting beyond the edge of the vessel; the projecting arm or beam of a crane.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Jibbing.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (participle) (p. pr.) (present participle)

Usage examples:

He and Jack Tier and Biddy got the jib hoisted by hand; and as for the fore- sail, that would almost set itself.
- Jack Tier or The Florida Reef by James Fenimore Cooper
Instantly I began to work might and main at my cumbrous tackle for shortening sail, and in the course of an hour and a half had the most of it reduced- the topsail yards down on the caps, the topsails clewed up, the sheets hauled in, the main and fore peaks lowered, and the flying- jib down.
- The Coral Island by R.M. Ballantyne
The jib was run up instantly to help her round, and under this sail the brig was headed directly towards the shore.
- Bonnie Prince Charlie A Tale of Fontenoy and Culloden by G. A. Henty