lustre

Definitions:

See Lustrum.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Brightness; splendour; fame; renown; a candlestick or gas pendant, ornamented with drops, & c.; in min., a term intended to describe the intensity and quality of the light reflected from the newly- fractured surfaces of rocks and minerals, as a mineral of a splendent, shining, metallic, vitreous, or pearly lustre.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Brightness; splendour; distinction; renown; the quality and intensity reflected from mineral surfaces; a chandelier ornamented with pendants of cut glass; a lustrous cloth.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Lustrous.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Brightness: splendor: ( fig.) renown: a candlestick ornamented with pendants of cut- glass.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Brightness; a candlestick with pendants.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)

Usage examples:

Their religious life, as it glows in intensity, or with a faint and failing lustre will be repeated in answering image from the widening frontier.
- Opening Ceremonies of the New York and Brooklyn Bridge, May 24, 1883 by William C. Kingsley Seth Low Franklin Edson
If Jesus had shrunk from the full consequences of His actions; if He had temporised, concealed Himself, tried to gain time, or adopted any other subterfuge or expedient in order to save His life- that life would not have the moral power it possesses or shine with such glorious lustre in the world to- day.
- The New Theology by R. J. Campbell
Stimulated by the success at Rome fifty years earlier, they were, with fresh insolence, demanding " land," and during the centuries which followed, the Gallic name acquired no fresh lustre in Greece.
- A Short History of France by Mary Platt Parmele