obtuse

Definitions:

Blunt; not pointed or acute; denoting an angle larger than a right angle; dull; not sharp. Obtuse- angled, having obtuse angle. See Obtund.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Not pointed or acute; being greater than a right angle, or one of 90°; dull; stupid; in bot., with a rounded or blunt termination.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Blunt; not pointed; greater than a right angle; stupid.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Obtusely.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adverb) (adv.) (adverb)
Blunt: not pointed: stupid: not shrill: ( geom.) greater than a right angle.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Obtuseness.
- Newage Dictionary DB (noun) (n.) (noun)
Not pointed or acute; as, an obtuse angle; greater than a right angle; blunt; dull; stupid.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)

Usage examples:

A. We find comparatively few original wooden roofs in structures of the fourteenth century, for such have generally been superseded by roofs of a later date and of a more obtuse form.
- The Principles of Gothic Ecclesiastical Architecture, Elucidated by Question and Answer, 4th ed. by Matthew Holbeche Bloxam
And it was his design that she should admire the display; he was anything but obtuse enjoying the match as he did and necessarily did to act so excellent a part in it, he meant the observer to see the man he was with a lady not of raw understanding.
- The Complete Project Gutenberg Works of George Meredith by George Meredith
I wrote:- I think Northerners must often seem to these people strangely obtuse in their attitude.
- Lady Baltimore by Owen Wister