orthodox

Definitions:

Holding the accepted faith, belief, or doctrine; according to the accepted belief or doctrine.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Sound in the Christian faith, as taught in the formularies of any particular Church; sound in opinion and doctrine; not heretical.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Orthedoxy.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Correct in doctrine.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Holding what is regarded as the correct opinion, especially in regard to religion.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Sound in doctrine: believing the received or established opinions, esp. in religion: according to the received doctrine.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)

Usage examples:

Mr. Williamson's Poems of Nature and Life are as orthodox in spirit as they are commonplace in form.
- Reviews by Oscar Wilde
He said there were three things he could not comprehend- orthodox piety, romantic love, and music.
- A Biographical Dictionary of Freethinkers of All Ages and Nations by Joseph Mazzini Wheeler
At a following sitting the communicator said to Dr Hodgson, " I have met your father; we talked, and we liked each other very much, but he was not very orthodox when he was alive."
- Mrs. Piper & the Society for Psychical Research by Michael Sage