premise

Definitions:

To speak or write previously, or as introductory to the main subject; to lay down as propositions to reason from.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb) (v.) (verb)
To send or state before the rest: to make an introduction: to lay down propositions for subsequent reasonings.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
The two propositions of a syllogism, called respectively major and minor, from which the conclusion is deduced, subject- matter of a conveyance or deed as set forth in the beginning; a building and its adjuncts.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (s. & pl.) (singular, plural)
To make an explanation beforehand.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)
That which is premised: a proposition antecedently supposed or proved for after- reasoning: ( logic) one of the two propositions in a syllogism from which the conclusion is drawn: the thing set forth in the beginning of a deed:- pl. a building and its adjuncts.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To speak or write as introductory to the main subject; to explain or offer previously; to lay down as first propositions on which the subsequent ones are based.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (verb) (v.) (verb)
To state, or lay down, first.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
A proposition laid down or proven, as a basis for argument.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To state in advance, as an explanation.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
A statement accepted as true from which a conclusion is drawn.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
A preposition antecedently assumed or laid down.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To state antecedent propositions.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb, noun) (v. & n.) (verb, noun)

Usage examples:

Fundamentally, type characterization rests on a false premise namely, that every human being may be adequately represented by some dominant characteristic or small group of closely related characteristics.
- Dramatic Technique by George Pierce Baker
Granting our opponents' premise temporarily, the conclusion is logically unavoidable that in order to restore a normal relation between the so- called more and less intelligent or desirable classes of society, we must put into the hands of all the methods of restricting their increase, now utilized only by the few."
- The Red Conspiracy by Joseph J. Mereto
Before commencing the narrative of the adventures which he met with, it is necessary to premise that no person can travel among the different states and kingdoms on the continent of Europe without what is called a passport.
- Rollo in Switzerland by Jacob Abbott