purge

Definitions:

To become pure by clarification; to have frequent evacuations.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb, noun) (v. & n.) (verb, noun)
To become pure by clarifying: to have frequent evacuations.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)
To cleanse or purify; to clear from guilt or moral defilement; to clear from accusation; to sweep away impurities; to defecate.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb) (v.) (verb)
To become pure or clean.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)
To make pure: to carry off whatever is impure or superfluous: to clear from guilt: to evacuate, as the bowels: to clarify, as liquors.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
A medicine that causes frequent evacuations of the intestines.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To cleanse; clear; purify.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
A cathartic medicine.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To free from impurities; to clear of guilt; remove or wash away; as, to purge one's sins; to cleanse by the action of a cathartic medicine.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
Purger.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
A medicine that evacuates the intestines.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To cleanse or clear from impurities; to purify; to clear from guilt or moral defilement; to have frequent loose evacuations from the intestines.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (verb) (v.) (verb)

Usage examples:

You are always seeking some satisfaction to your consciences besides this, but believe it all that can be said, besides this atonement and propitiation, is of no more virtue to purge your consciences, or satisfy your perplexed souls, than those repeated sacrifices of old were.
- The Works of the Rev. Hugh Binning by Hugh Binning
Purge my heart from hard and bitter thoughts.
- The Spirit of Christmas by Henry Van Dyke
Question by the Reverend Mr. Hewlitt: " I take it that you are making this confession of your own free will and in order to clear the name of an innocent party from blame and to purge your own soul?"
- The Best Short Stories of 1921 and the Yearbook of the American Short Story by Various