rectify

Definitions:

To correct the faults in; to remove mistakes from; to set right; refine or purify; as, to rectify whisky.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
To make straight or right: to adjust: to correct or redress: to refine by distillation:- pa. t. and pa. p. rectified.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
rectifica'tion.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To set right; correct; refine by distillation.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
To make or set right; to correct; to redress; in chem., to purify a substance by repeated distillation; to regulate or adjust.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (verb) (v.) (verb)
Rectified.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (participle) (p.t. & p.p.) (past tense, past participle)
Rectifying.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (participle) (p. pr.) (present participle)
To correct; to refine by repeated distillation or sublimation. To rectify a globe, to adjust it for the solution of a proposed problem.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb) (v.) (verb)
Rectifier, rectification.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)

Usage examples:

And is it not, therefore, to every one's interest to rectify them in the long run?
- The Country Doctor by Honore de Balzac
I am, however, far from being of that opinion; and will venture to affirm, though a very accurate description of the country, and of the most obvious customs of its inhabitants, has been already given, especially by Captain Cook, that much still remains untouched; that, in some instances, mistakes have been made, which later and repeated observation has been able to rectify and that, even now, we are strangers to many of the most important institutions that prevail amongst these people.
- A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 16 by Robert Kerr
I found it also necessary to read a great number of works, in order to rectify important errors to which the want of authentic documents had induced the authors to give credit.
- The Project Gutenberg Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte by Bourrienne, Constant, and Stewarton