salamander

Definitions:

An amphibious animal, allied to the newts, and fabled to be able to live in fire. Salamander's hair or wool, a name given to a species of asbestos or mineral flax.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
A fabulous animal, said to have been able to live amongst fire; a reptile of the lizard kind.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Small reptile, once thought to be able to live in fire.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
A genus of reptiles allied to the frog, once supposed able to live in fire.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)
An animal resembling a lizard, able to live both on land and in water, and believed by the ancients to be able to live in fire.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Salamandrine.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)

Usage examples:

Ask him, Salamander if we may expect the storm soon.
- The Big Otter by R.M. Ballantyne
And he soon learned to cry Salamander and to rub his mug on the table, German fashion.
- The Crisis, Volume 4 by Winston Churchill
Like a salamander he basked in the heat, and would not allow either door or window to be opened, even in the midst of summer, when a large fire made the apartment almost unendurable.
- The Secret Passage by Fergus Hume