salient

Definitions:

Leaping; springing; in a leaping posture; projecting outward; prominent.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Salience.
- Newage Dictionary DB (noun) (n.) (noun)
Leaping or springing: ( fort.) projecting outwards, as an angle: prominent: ( geom.) denoting any angle less than two right angles.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Leaping; beating; springing; projecting outwards, as an angle; forcing itself on the attention; conspicuous; noticeable.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Saliently.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adverb) (adv.) (adverb)
A projecting angle.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Leaping or bounding; outstanding; noticeable; as, salient characteristics; projecting outward; as, a salient angle.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Shooting out; projecting.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)

Usage examples:

An account of the most salient features of the history of the Cause, a brief but impressive reference to its many heroes and martyrs, a convincing and comprehensive presentation of the basic principles, and a characteristic survey of the Master's life, as well as a short but graphic description of the present position and influence of the Movement both in the East and the West, should, in my opinion, be included and combined into one conclusive argument.
- Unfolding Destiny by Shoghi Effendi
If inflection be made longer and more salient there must also be longer pauses, greater changes of pitch, and greater variations of movement and color.
- Browning and the Dramatic Monologue by S. S. Curry
This transition from one picture to another was accepted by one of the audience as an opportunity to shift his chair, and Leigh saw the bishop's salient profile thrown for a moment on the canvas, before he subsided again to the general level.
- The Mayor of Warwick by Herbert M. Hopkins