sedentary

Definitions:

One of a tribe of spiders called the sedentaria.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Not free- living ; animals attached by a base to some substratum.
- A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Sitting much: passed chiefly in sitting: requiring much sitting: inactive.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Accustomed to pass much time in a sitting posture; marked by, or requiring, much sitting; as, sedentary work.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Sedentarily.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adverb) (adv.) (adverb)
Accustomed to sit much; requiring much sitting.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Accustomed to sit much; requiring much sitting; passed for most part in sitting; inactive; sluggish.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
One of a tribe of spiders which rest motionless until their prey is entangled in their web.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Sedentariness.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Accustomed to pass much time in a sitting posture; requiring much sitting or inactivity, as an employment or profession; inactive; sluggish.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)

Usage examples:

Now we will hear the other side, and find out why the morbid, tired man, the modern Hamlet, likes it not, why the son of culture loathes it as a lack- lustre thing, betokening to him the sedentary and respectable world in its most hostile form.
- Garden-Craft Old and New by John D. Sedding
I said to myself that I was not getting the amount of exercise that once I had; that my occupation was now more sedentary and therefore it stood to reason that I should take on a little flesh here and there over my frame.
- One Third Off by Irvin S. Cobb
Indeed, many kinds of food or foods in great quantity are not desirable for a child who sits quietly at study much of the day or for a person of sedentary occupation.
- School and Home Cooking by Carlotta C. Greer