smother

Definitions:

To be suffocated; to smoke without vent.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb, noun) (v. & n.) (verb, noun)
Smoke: thick floating dust.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To be suffocated or suppressed: to smoulder.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)
That which suffocates; smoke; thick dust.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To suffocate.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
To suffocate; to stifle; to suppress.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb) (v.) (verb)
To extinguish life by causing smoke or dust to enter th lungs, or by depriving the lungs of air; to extinguish fire by excluding air; to suffocate; to choke; to be suffocated; to be suppressed or concealed.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (verb) (v.) (verb)
To be stified.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)
Smoke; thick dust.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Stifling smoke or thick dust.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To suffocate by excluding the air: to conceal.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
To destroy the life of by depriving of air; stifle; suppress or conceal; as, to smother one's anger.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
A smoke; thick dust.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To be suffocated or deprived of air.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. i.) (verb intransitive)

Usage examples:

When Bear Cat had trusted himself so recklessly on the threshold while the opposite door still stood open, the spectral figures with masked faces could have streamed in, wave on wave, to smother out any up- flaming spirit of resistance, but in doing that there would have been hand- to- hand conflict, in which the innocent must pay as heavy and ultimate a penalty as the guilty.
- When 'Bear Cat' Went Dry by Charles Neville Buck
If she would only speak altogether in that beloved language, he could smother much malice.
- The World For Sale, Volume 2. by Gilbert Parker
My silent son- in- law looks as if he longed to smother me, and my attention is naturally distracted.
- The Black Robe by Wilkie Collins