subordinate

Definitions:

To place in an order or rank below something else; to make or consider as of less value or importance; to make subject.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb) (v.) (verb)
In a lower order or rank; inferior.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
To place in a lower order: to consider of less value: to make subject.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
One in a lower order or rank: an inferior.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Subordination.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
One who stands in rank or dignity below another; an inferior person.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Subordinateness.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
One who stands in order or rank below another.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
An inferior.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
One who is below another in rank, etc.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Inferior in nature, rank, or importance; descending in a regular series.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Lower in order, rank, nature, power, etc.: descending in a regular series.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
To place in a lower order; make inferior or subject.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
Subordinately.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adverb) (adv.) (adverb)
Inferior in order, dignity, power or importance; descending in a regular series.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Lower in rank, value, power, or importance; subject to another; in grammar, denoting the less important clause of a complex sentence, or the conjunction which introduces it.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
To place in order or rank below another; to consider of less value or importance; to make of less value.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (verb) (v.) (verb)
To place in a lower order; to make subject or obedient to.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)

Usage examples:

Text- books help us a little on the road of learning; but, by and by, whatever our pursuit or profession, we leave them behind, or else content ourselves with a subordinate position.
- Thoughts on Educational Topics and Institutions by George S. Boutwell
Father Beret was probably subordinate to Father Gibault.
- Alice of Old Vincennes by Maurice Thompson
Thus the two orders are seen in their origin to be both of divine institution; just as the life of man upon earth was from the beginning subordinate to his ultimate end, so government, which was created for the former, was subordinate to worship, which was created for the latter.
- Church and State as Seen in the Formation of Christendom by T. W. Allies