substantive

Definitions:

Solid; real; essential.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
A noun, or a phrase, clause, etc., used as a noun.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Expressing existence.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
SUBSTANTIVELY.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (adverb) (adv.) (adverb)
Expressing existence; independent.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
The name of something that exists, or is conceived to exist, either material or immaterial; a noun.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Expressing existence; as, the verb to be is the substantive verb; being used as a noun; as, a substantive phrase; essential or necessary; real; lasting.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Expressing existence: real: of real, independent importance.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
A noun.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
In gram., that part of speech which expresses something that exists, real or imaginary; a noun or name.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (noun) (n.) (noun)
The part of speech denoting something that exists: a noun.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)

Usage examples:

Every one of these are overt acts of the general charge of bribery, and they are every one of them, separately taken, substantive crimes.
- The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. X. (of 12) by Edmund Burke
Now, the very same reason which warrants, or rather obliges them to recognize " matter" as a substance and not as a shadow,- as an entity which really exists and manifests itself by its properties and effects,- must equally warrant, or rather oblige them to recognize " mind" or " spirit" also as a distinct substantive being, unless it can be shown either that its properties are the same with those of matter, or that they may be accounted for by some peculiar modification of matter, some law of physical organization.
- Modern Atheism under its forms of Pantheism, Materialism, Secularism, Development, and Natural Laws by James Buchanan
It was in 1830 that he made his first substantive appearance with a book of Poems.
- A History of Nineteenth Century Literature (1780-1895) by George Saintsbury