tapestry

Definitions:

A kind of carpeting, used for hangings to the walls of rooms, coverings for thrones, chairs of state, & c., dyed of various colours, and often embroidered with gold and silver work; called also arras.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (noun) (n.) (noun)
To hang, or adorn, with tapestry.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
Kind of hangings with embroidered figures.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Tapestrying.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (participle) (p. pr.) (present participle)
To adorn with tapestry.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
A kind of woven hangings of wool and silk, often enriched with gold and silver, representing figures of men, animals, landscapes, & c.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)
A fabric in which threads are so woven as to form a picture.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Tapestried.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (participle) (p.t. & p.p.) (past tense, past participle)
To adorn with tapestry, or as if with tapestry. " The Trosachs wound, as now, between gigantic walls of rock tapestried with broom and wild roses."- Macaulay.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
To adorn with tapestry, or as if with it.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (verb) (v.) (verb)
A kind of woven hangings of wool and silk, often enriched with gold and silver, representing figures of men, animals, landscapes, etc., and formerly much used for lining or covering the walls and furniture of apartments, churches, etc. Tapestry is made by a process intermediate between weaving and embroidery, being worked in a web with needles instead of a shuttle. Short lengths of thread of the special colors required for the design are worked in at the necessary places and fastened at the back of the texture. The term tapestry is also applied to a variety of woven fabrics having a multiplicity of colors in their design, which, however, have no other characteristic of true tapestry.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)

Usage examples:

One unique piece of tapestry had cost him less than one- tenth of that sum.
- The Ways of Men by Eliot Gregory
Although gold and silver was lying about in heaps, with all kinds of rich tapestry and other countless treasures, he would neither touch them himself nor allow the others to do so, though some helped themselves without his knowledge.
- Plutarch's Lives, Volume II by Aubrey Stewart & George Long
Will you come and look at our tapestry
- Marcella by Mrs. Humphry Ward