travesty

Definitions:

Disguised by dress so as to be ridiculous.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Having on the vesture or dress of another: disguised so as to be ridiculous.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
To parody.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
To parody; to represent so as to make ludicrous.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
Travestying.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (participle) (p. pr.) (present participle)
To represent, as a serious work, in a burlesque style.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (verb) (v.) (verb)
To turn into burlesque.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (verb) (v. t.) (verb transitive)
A kind of burlesque in which the original characters are preserved, the situations parodied.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)
A burlesque or parody; any absurd or grotesque likeness.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Travestied.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (participle) (p.t. & p.p.) (past tense, past participle)
A parody in which a serious subject is treated in a ludicrous manner.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (noun) (n.) (noun)
The representation of a serious work in a burlesque style.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (noun) (n.) (noun)

Usage examples:

The banker cleared his throat: " Mr. Lyman, even after a night of worried reflection, I am even now hardly able to realize the monstrous outrage that has been committed at the instance of a theologic imbecile, helped by a travesty on law enacted by a general assembly of ditch diggers and plowmen."
- Old Ebenezer by Opie Read
The first portion of the performance was received, on the whole, favourably, though there was no enthusiasm; but, when Frederick Lemaitre, who was entrusted with the role of Vautrin, came on to the stage, in the fourth act, dressed as a Mexican general, and wearing his forelock of hair in a way that appeared to imitate a like peculiarity in the King, there was an outcry among the audience; and Louis- Philippe's son, who was present, was informed by complaisant courtiers that the travesty was intended as an insult to his father.
- Balzac by Frederick Lawton
For the silence had been suddenly broken by a girl's sharp, hysterical laugh, and though the sound was but a travesty yet it was surely Leonie's laugh.
- Leonie of the Jungle by Joan Conquest