witty

Definitions:

Possessed of wit; given to indulge in wit; full of wit; sarcastic; smart spoken; judicious; ingenious.
- Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Possessed of wit; full of wit; facetious.
- Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Wittier.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (comp.) (comparative)
Having the faculty of arousing laughter by a bright or unusual way of expressing ideas; as, a witty person; marked by quickness and cleverness; as, witty remarks.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
Wittily.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (adverb) (adv.) (adverb)
Wittiest.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (superl.) (superlative)
Possessed of wit: amusing: droll: sarcastic: ( B.) ingenious.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)
WHITTINESS.
- The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Wittiness.
- The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919. (noun) (n.) (noun)
Having wit; droll; facetious.
- The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894. (adjective) (adj.) (adjective)

Usage examples:

Horns are like teeth, a witty woman once said: they hurt while they are coming, but afterwards one manages to put up with them!
- French and Oriental Love in a Harem by Mario Uchard
On glass how witty is a noble peer!
- The Poetical Works of Edward Young, Volume 2 by Edward Young
There was no other possible rival to Cardillac, to his distinction, his power of witty and malicious after- dinner speaking, his wonderful clothes, his admirable football, his haughty indifference.
- The Prelude to Adventure by Hugh Walpole